3 Wishes for 2016

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I’ve never been big on resolutions. It wasn’t a thing we did in our family. We didn’t sit around the table on December 31st talking about our plans for the coming year. We didn’t write out our plans and check in every month to see if we were still on track to meet those resolutions. We just didn’t do that.

We were taught to set goals. We were encouraged to figure out a step-by-step process to meet our goals. We were cheered on and we always knew that our parents would listen and help and be there for us as we reached for our own personal goals. But those goals could be set at any time. Ringing in a New Year didn’t mean an opportunity for personal development, it meant celebrating what we achieved the previous year and looking forward to another year of health and happiness.

As I got older I saw friends fall into the trap of resolutions centered around weight loss, healthy eating and increased exercise. I admired their focus in those first few months of each year; though I stuck with my usual plan of running because it feels good and everything in moderation. I didn’t want the added pressure of meeting a goal meant to improve my overall lifestyle – what works for some doesn’t work for all.

As we crawl into 2016, I certainly do have a few personal goals on my mind. Write on my own blog more often. Finish the new book proposal. Continue to book speaking engagements to spread the Happy Kid message. The truth is, those goals have been on my mind for quite some time now. It’s not about 2016. I can’t possibly predict what will happen this year, but I can keep those goals in mind as I work my way through this year.

What I do have for 2016 is big wishes. It’s no big secret that I’m a dreamer. To know me personally is to know that a blank stare out the window isn’t a sign of unhappiness or stress but a sign of ideas rolling through my mind.

Yet sometimes I feel burdened by those thoughts and dreams. I’m a sensitive soul, and I tend to spend too much time thinking about ways change the world for the better. Some of those ideas are too big for one person to tackle. Some will always be a work in progress. And some, well, some might not come to fruition.

But I find that big ideas are always worth considering. If we can take steps to make the world a better place, we should. Even if those steps feel small in size. Even if it feels like some steps are taken alone.

With that in mind, please consider these three wishes for 2016. Together we can make a difference.

Focus on positive parenting.

I recently wrote an article about time-outs – specifically, why I’m not a fan. I believe in solving problems together, and giving children the opportunity to vent and work through emotions with someone who will listen, no matter how tired or frustrated that someone might be.

Some of the comments left in response to that article left me feeling sad, for both kids and parents. I whip mine. I pinch mine. I spank mine. I just yell and they stop. All I have to do is threaten them. The negative parenting strategies seemed to go on and on.

The article included specific strategies to decrease parental frustration and help parents help their kids through upsetting situations, and yet many of the responses focused on the so-called benefits of physical punishment and intimidation.

Children learn through trial and error. They have big feelings and they don’t always know what to do with those feelings. They don’t always get it right. But that’s what being a kid is all about – learning and growing and finding new ways to handle everyday issues.

I can’t help but consider what a child might say if given the chance to talk under such circumstances…

Please don’t hit me. Please don’t yell at me. Please don’t scare me. I’m little and I’m learning and I need your love and support along the way.

There are many wonderful therapists and educators out there trying to help spread positive parenting techniques. Pick up your copy of The Happy Kid Handbook – it is full of practical and easy-to-implement strategies, I promise. Then follow these wonderful resources:

Talk about mental illness

Let this be the year that people feel comfortable opening up about mental health. Let this be the year that the word suicide stops scaring people into silence. Let this be the year that words like “anxiety” and “depression” hold their true meaning, and that people can use them at the dinner table as they would any other word to describe any other illness.

I watch as parents try to minimize the meaning of anxiety and depression when it comes to their kids. She’s just not herself right now. She’ll be good as new soon! I watch as people go silent when mental health becomes a topic in the room.

People are suffering in this world – and all too often they suffer in silence. It’s time to break the silence on mental illness. It’s time to learn how to listen without going silent. It’s time to learn to ask one simple question: How can I help?

It’s okay that you don’t know what to say. It’s okay that the thought of suicide scares you or that you don’t really understand the meaning of depression. But it’s not okay to judge, walk away from a friend in need or minimize the struggles of others. It’s not okay to turn the other cheek.

Let this be the year that we all learn to speak clearly and listen with open hearts.

Slow down and play

We live in a high stress world where the race to the finish is causing our children pain and heartache. They are doing too much highly structured stuff and not enough good for their souls stuff. It’s time to stop building the resume. It’s time to slow down, take back childhood and truly get back to the business of play.

In just a few weeks, parents everywhere will begin stressing about summer plans. How many camps will keep my kids busy? What enrichment programs will help them get ahead? How much do I need to bribe them to read? I’ve heard it all before, and I will hear it all again.

But before you step back on the fast track to busy, consider this: Kids today are play deprived. Kids today are under stress and experiencing higher rates of anxiety and depression. Kids today are sleep deprived. Consider the whole child before you mark up those summer months. Consider getting back to basics and giving your child the chance to do what kids are meant to do: Play and act like kids.

On that note, I’m off to play. Wishing you the very best in the coming year. Happy 2016!

 

 

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About Katie

Katie Hurley is a Child, Adolescent, and Family Psychotherapist and Parenting Expert in Los Angeles, CA. She works in private practice in the South Bay area of Los Angeles, writes for PBS Parents, Washington Post Parents, and the Huffington Post. She is the author of "The Happy Kid Handbook: How to Raise Joyful Children in a Stressful World" (Tarcher/Penguin, 2015) and the forthcoming "No More Mean Girls: The Secret to Raising Strong, Confident, and Compassionate Girls" (Penguin Random House, 2018)